Monthly Archives: April 2012

The Blue Roads of Cannes

Away from the homages, special screenings, classic films, away from the red carpet ride to that palace of dreams, away from the Cinema Paradiso deep in the watery hearts of those days of ‘how it used to be before they built the new Palais.’ Away from the game before it became the game it is “guarded by thin-lipped security experts..” (Roger Ebert).

Away from: This is a business after all, bringing in hundreds of millions (billions) annually. Away from the other Cannes down in the concrete heated bowels of an airless bunker where the sharp weave themselves into tongued-tied hoarse and whispery tanglings over business fits and contracts and suits.

Away from the silver screen stars of present and past, Charles Bronson and Miss Piggy, Arnold, Bruce, Brad, Brigitte, Mel, Kirk, Michael, Woody or Penelope, away from the belle epoque hotel suites and facades, away from yachts as big as small apartment blocks stock stilled by the importance of those they house out in the wide bay, away from those gleaming bright decks, practiced sunglasses, strategic smiles, away from trained binocularists, the annual crush and cheap ticket ride along the promenading, skateboard Croisette, away from the blinding baroque plaster, the guest only dinners, friend-of-a-friend-who-knows-a-friend ticket-only beach parties, away from the clickety-click crush of pass-only photo shoots, prized seats under the balcony, away from ‘go easy I’m-not-wearing-makeup’, away from  the bright-new-glory of my-new-found-fame, those bullish, brave, belligerent and bereft smiles, away from the silent jeering, away from the exclusion zones out in the streets.

Away from get away from who-are-you-and-who-do-you-know big films and titles, away from that winnowy fame and limouey celebrity, over in the back blue road of Mediterraneanised cinema, over in – I only hole up in the dark to witness creative endeavour – over in this other plane and train load of tourist-class, over in the world you mostly will never hear talk long enough to remember how to forget, over in the altogether smaller world of Un Certain Regard, with a jury presided over by Tim Roth.

Among the yet no-so unfamous such as Benicio DEL TORO, Pablo TRAPERO, Julio MEDEM,  Elia SULEIMAN, Juan Carlos TABIO, Gaspard NOÉ et Laurent CANTET with 7 DIAS EN LA HABANA @ 2h and 5m,  four first-filmers, Brandon Cronenberg (yes, that Cronenberg) with ANTIVIRAL @ 1h and 50m, Ashim AHLUWALIA with MISS LOVELY  @ 1hr 50m, and Juan Andrés Arango with LA PLAYA @ 1h and 30m.

Roth’s own brit pack ever-repressed to boiling anger ride through names and changes in life and cinema from Dulwich to Los Angeles via works by Mike Leigh, Stephen Frears, Peter Greenaway, Robert Altman, Quentin Tarantino, Nic Roeg, John Sayles, Wim Wenders, Tim Burton, Woody Allen, Werner Herzog and Francis Ford Coppola seems to offer interesting, experimental possibilities as what might emerge as the final choice.


		
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Cannes and Experimental Film

From one of cinema’s earliest experimental films, Luis Buñuel’s Un Chien Andalou (1929), to Maya Deren’s Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), winner in 1947 of  Cannes’ Grand Prix Internationale for 16mm experimental film, on to the films of Cocteau, Godard, Tati, Fellini, Lynch, Cronenberg and others, the notion of the film experiment inspires admiration, distaste, love and hatred in film audiences. Commercial movies (frantic pacing, hackneyed surprise, worn-out tropes, special effects barages), with their hero and quest driven narratives, seem diametrically opposed to the whimsical, subjective, interior, asymmetric, disjointed, dream-state inspired plotless, timeless, amoral, and often carelessly created worlds of the film experiment. Yet most if not all conventional cinema depends entirely on the concept and nature of experimental film. It’s axiomatic: without the experiment there is no convention. Experiment lies at the heart of cinema not only because early cine-cameramen experimented with moving images and celluloid film created art (even if art wasn’t the intention); experiment is the fundamental ancestor of all cinema.

A film that succeeds at the box office will often be remembered for a sequence that cites, borrows from film experimentation.

Commercial filmmakers often reconfigure ideas and approaches from earlier films, all art in fact, but they owe their largest debt to the spirit of film experiment in all its disguises.

Cannes encourages filmmakers to exhibit their experimental works in Un Certain Regard. 2012’s lineup includes sons of the famous in twenty chosen films. The route of an art film to the festival’s screens is not simple, with the spirit of today’s Deren or Buñuel struggling to shine in the annual failed attempts of filmmakers with ‘unexhibitable’ projects we never see, but without which we would know little of the true scope of cinematic experimentation.

where is “Bukowski” by Swimanog listed on Google

  1. fiction | Swimanog

    swimanog.wordpress.com/category/fiction/

    11 Mar 2012 – His first book was a translation of Charles Bukowski’s The Days Run Away ….. “[I] found the order (or found the copy on Google Book Search 🙂

    You’ve visited this page 2 times. Last visit: 15/04/12 (did I? My memory must be playing tricks…)
  2. politics | Swimanog

    swimanog.wordpress.com/category/politics/

    19 Feb 2012 – I am writing to point out Google’s association – inadvertent association, http://swimanog.wordpress.com I put the post up on 18th May, 2009. (was it worth it?)

  3. postmodernism | Swimanog

    swimanog.wordpress.com/category/postmodernism/

    11 Mar 2012 – “[I] found the order (or found the copy on Google Book Search 🙂 …. and artists listed in the book’s acknowledgements starting with ABBA!). (Why not begin with ABBA?)

  4. Blogroll | Swimanog | Page 2

    swimanog.wordpress.com/category/blogroll/page/2/

    17 Aug 2010 – It was Bukowski’s birthday (16th August) – the LA Times alerted me. …. “[I] found the order (or found the copy on Google Book Search 🙂 …. hundred authors and artists listed in the book’s acknowledgements starting with ABBA! (ditto)

  5. Louisiana Alba (Author of Uncorrected Proof)

     Rating: 4 – 3 votes

    28 Jun 2009 – My blog – posts on Bukowski, Fellini, GFC and many more. Http://swimanog.wordpress.com read more » · 0 comments …. A good overview, that puts Google in perspective, answering many questions if not all. Dec 07, 2011 … (now putting Google in perspective…?)

  6. LiteraryMinded – Part 45

    blogs.crikey.com.au/literaryminded/page/45/

    26 Sep 2008 – internet multinationals, such as Yahoo, Google, Cisco and Microsoft, ….. Roald Dahl and moved on to Charles Bukowski—go figure—so they … (yes, so they..)

  7. Bret Easton Ellis in Australia | LiteraryMinded

    literaryminded.wordpress.com/tag/bret-easton-ellis-in-australia/

    20 Aug 2010 – as akin to an LA literary tradition, with people like Fante and Bukowski…. RT @nztaylor: On blog: Google Ebooks launches in Australia with

  8. Top Pictures – bukowski

    en.topictures.com/bukowski

    5+ items – Top Pictures: bukowski, Image search results giving you the top

    Charles Bukowski – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia jpg – 220×190 Charles
    Bukowski | Swimanog jpg – 300×517 Bukowski
  9. სურათები – bukowski

    ka.bestpicturesof.com/bukowski

    5+ items – სურათები : bukowskiGoogle გამოსახულებებიდან, bing-იდან

    Don’t blame Bukowski for bad poetry | Books | guardian jpg – 460×300
    Bukowski | Swimanog jpg – 300×517
    I began a search on Google to see whether all the people (listed as hits) actually did see my post on Bukowski and after going through 17 Google pages and not arriving at my post I gave up…I thought I could be in a capsule hurtling out somewhere further into the outer universe saying hello, hello.? Now, self-referencing has some sense, maybe not much sense, but some at least, more sense than ending up on page 107 on Google…Watching Damien Hirst talk about himself brought it all home. We endlessly auto-reference. Click on the links for ‘Damien Hirst’ and then on ‘himself’ a few seconds, maybe a minute later and play them simulacrously but starting at different points. Somehow to hear Hirst in disjointed stereo makes more sense (at least to me) 
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/video/2012/apr/16/damien-hirst-tate-modern-exhibition-tour-video
    The need to reinvent everything endlessly…
      

The Price So Many Are Paying

With the global financial crisis deepening and spreading into communities (aided and abetted by years of political corruption) in recent months the number of workers in Italy who have taken their own lives has risen fast.

Below are some of their stories

See more of these printed in L’Espresso (in Italian) – 13th April 2012

13 April 2012. Sesto, Fiorentina, Firenze. Giuliano V., ex-manager, 42, died by throwing himself under a freight train. Four months before he had lost his position in the marble production sector in Garfagnana. Falling into a deep depression he had tried to create a new life and career without success.

12 April 2012. Treviso. Paolo Tonin, 53, agricultural businessman hanged himself in his business premises. According to his family, the suicide was as a direct result of the difficult economic climate his business had been plunged into.

9 April 2012. Valtiberina, Arezzo, 27, owner of a woodcutting business, killed himself in a forest by connecting a hose to the exhaust pipe of his car. Family and friends said he was overwhelmed by his debts. He had just received a tax bill for 50,000 euros.

5 April 2012. Savona. Vittorio Galasso, independent builder, 52,  hanged himself in the apartment he was renovating. According to friends, he could not go on facing little work and rising debts.  He left a wife and two children of 15 and 17 years.

3 April 2012. Roma. Mario Frasacco, businessman, 59. His aluminium products company failing, workers being laid off, Frasacco shot himself in his business premises. His body was found the morning after by his twenty year old son.

2 April 2012. Roma. Pasqualino Clotilde, artisan, 57, hanged himself in his framing shop. A note explained his reasons: “insurmountable economic problems.” The day before his wife had begun working in a cleaning company to help pay off family debts.

23 March 2012. Cepagatti, Pescara. E.F, businessman, 44 years, hanged himself because he was desperate over the economic situation of his window and door frame company.  His body was found by his company employees.

21 March 2012. Scorrano (Lecce). Antonio Maggio, craftsman, 29, hanged himself after losing his job on an excavation site. With the job he had been supporting his widowed mother. A few days before he lost his job, he received a payment notice for rubbish collection.

9 March 2012. Ginosa Marina (Taranto). Vincenzo Di Tinco, 60, shopkeeper, hanged himself after his bank refused him help. Proprietor of clothing company he was refused a 1,300 euro loan notwithstanding his 40 years in business.

9 March 2012. Noventa di Piave (Venezia). Carpenter, 60, took his own life because delay in receiving payments from clients. His body was found by a co-worker in their work premises.

26 February 2012. Firenze. Businessman, 64, found hanging in his premises, due to economic difficulties.

15 February 2012. Paternò (Catania). Owner, 57, of an  agricultural machinery company, hanged himself in his warehouse. His company had numerous debts.

3 January 2012. Milano. Giancarlo Chiodini, electrician, 64, shot himself in the head in his van parked in front of his work premises. Dedicated to his work, in recent times he had become obsessed by worry over promised contracts that did not materialise and delayed payments.

(translated by this writer)